From: Lynn Parucci <Parruccip@AOL.COM> To: ISEN-ASTC-L@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM

ISEN-ASTC-L is a service of the Association of Science-Technology Centers Incorporated, a worldwide network of science museums and related institutions. *****************************************************************************

RE: Halloween and fog programs...

Last year at the ASTC conference, the Edmonton Science Center staff performed a soda-pop science demonstration using dry ice. It was great. We brought it back to the Carnegie just in time for Halloween. After the basic soda pop, we made a blend of Applejuice, cinnamon and cloves. We called it Monster Juice! It's great because the CO2 expands in apple juice, in addition to the bubbling and fog this weird looking foam grows out of the top. Kids love it.

*********************************************************************** More information about the Informal Science Education Network and the Association of Science-Technology Centers may be found at http://www.astc.org. To remove your e-mail address from the ISEN-ASTC-L listserv, send the text SIGNOFF ISEN-ASTC-L in the BODY of a message to listserv@home.ease.lsoft.com.

Sender: ISEN-ASTC-L <ISEN-ASTC-L@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM> From: Jane Snell Copes <copes@SMM.ORG> Subject: Re: Halloween Science To: ISEN-ASTC-L@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM

ISEN-ASTC-L is a service of the Association of Science-Technology Centers Incorporated, a worldwide network of science museums and related institutions. *****************************************************************************

>We are doing a program called "Science Behind the Spook" to go along with our >annual non-scary Halloween celebration. I am looking for demos and >activities that will show a common trick - after the demo we will reveal what >really happened.

Chemistry demonstrations we did last year around Hallowe'en:

1. Orange and Black Start with beaker of tap water, add orange food coloring and orange extract (smell). Add decolorizing charcoal (black), pour through funnel with filter paper-->solution is colorless and odorless. Can use the "effluent" to start over (make it look and smell orange). Can also put the charcoal in the funnel rather than with the liquid.

2. Orange to Black Standard Iodine Clock reaction with orange food coloring added to the potassium iodate solution. Add second solution (sodium thiosulfate + starch), after 10-20 seconds, it "snaps" to black (well, very dark blue)

3. Firefly Juice Luminol + hydrogen peroxide luminescent reaction. We used Tygon tubing to spell "BOO" in script inside a cardboard box. Pour the solutions in the top, and you see the word glowing.

4. Orange-to-colorless This is a repeating reaction that works several times over 15 minutes. Malonic acid + potassium bromate _ manganese(II) sulfate solutions.

1 & 2 are reactions kids do individually with small beakers of the chemicals. 1. gives them a chance to learn to fold filter paper. 3 & 4 are better in big beakers or flasks or (with BOO) in a rigged set-up.

If you're interested, I can send you more directions. Jennifer, do you have some experience in making solutions, working with chemicals, etc? Makes a difference in how detailed your directions need to be. Best wishes, Jane

Jane Snell Copes mailto:copes@smm.org exhibit researcher Science Museum of Minnesota 30 E. 10th Street St. Paul, MN 55101

direct phone line til mid-September 651-291-5267 voice mail at this number: phone 651-221-2561

*********************************************************************** More information about the Informal Science Education Network and the Association of Science-Technology Centers may be found at http://www.astc.org. To remove your e-mail address from the ISEN-ASTC-L listserv, send the text SIGNOFF ISEN-ASTC-L in the BODY of a message to listserv@home.ease.lsoft.com.

Sender: ISEN-ASTC-L <ISEN-ASTC-L@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM> From: jonah h cohen <jonahc@JUNO.COM> Subject: Re: Halloween Science To: ISEN-ASTC-L@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM

ISEN-ASTC-L is a service of the Association of Science-Technology Centers Incorporated, a worldwide network of science museums and related institutions. *****************************************************************************

If you have access to liquid nitrogen, then showing how it makes lotsa spooky fog is always nice. Breathing in the fog is harmless and looks cool. Dry ice also makes fog - and, bonus, lots of bubbles - but don't inhale that. A lungful of CO2 is no fun.

Flinn Scientific has a kit which includes several creepy experiments.

Presuming you have such critters... a "the truth about scary animals" (ie snakes or tarantulas or toads) could prove educational.

There's a chemical reaction called the 'Old Nassau' reaction. I forget exactly what goes into this clock reaction (Terry?) but it turns from clear to orange, then to black.

Black lights not only are good for talking about light, but they light up stuff with a great effect. People wearing white at a Halloween event might be scarce, so bring your own stuff that will glow (freshly washed white clothes, fluorescent dye.)

This trick (lifted directly from Penn & teller's "How to Play in Traffic") might work well for a member's Halloween event - but it could be done to be rather scary. If you want to explain how it works, that's doable, if you want to discuss the science involved in photography. And the real downside: it's expensive.

Take a polaroid camera. After loading the film, open the back (this exposes one picture; and polaroid film is around $9 for 10 shots.) Insert a square of clear acetate (stuff used on an overhead projector on which you've drawn a picture in permanent marker. Draw whatever you like, but keep the doodle in the upper right corner. Once this clear film is in place, close the camera, take the exposed picture + dispose of it. Then find someone + snap their photo. The shadow from your picture shows up on the print, making it look like a ghost (or whatever) is hovering above their right shoulder.

This could be done quite eerily. At the Halloween event, signs at the entrance could warn that the museum is haunted. Museum workers (dress as the ghostbusters or men in black if you're really over the top) can roam with their special 'ghostcams' and offer to photograph patrons with the ghosts. The fact that the picture takes a minute to develop is the crowning touch.

Sticks = evil, Jonah Cohen Outreach Manager, Science Center of Connecticut

*********************************************************************** More information about the Informal Science Education Network and the Association of Science-Technology Centers may be found at http://www.astc.org. To remove your e-mail address from the ISEN-ASTC-L listserv, send the text SIGNOFF ISEN-ASTC-L in the BODY of a message to listserv@home.ease.lsoft.com.

SuperScienceSaturday: BackgroundInfo (last edited 2010-01-21 02:50:56 by localhost)